Wednesday, January 11, 2012

A Lifetime of Bondage

It's crazy to me that it's already been ten years since James Bond's last big anniversary celebration, when 2002's Die Another Day marked not only forty years of big screen Bonding, but also the twentieth official film in the longest-lived film series of all time. Given that we're now into the fiftieth year since Dr. No launched Ian Fleming's literary super-spy onto the big screen, and with a new 007 adventure starring Bond-of-record Daniel Craig set to assault theaters this November, it should come as a surprise to precisely no one that the folks at EON Productions, primary purveyors of all things Bond since the very beginning, had something special up their sleeve to make the occasion appropriately festive.

To wit, the just-announced Bond 50 blu-ray set, collecting each and every one of the twenty-two James Bond opuses from Dr. No to 2008's Quantum of Solace in one box. While this isn't 007's first appearance on blu, it is the first time every single movie is being put out with a hi-def spit-and-polish. As longtime readers here should well know, I've been a Bond diehard practically my whole life, and while I've seen each and every one of these flicks more times than I feel comfortable admitting on more formats than I can keep track of, just looking at this box has my mouth watering. The set is due out this fall, but you can lock in your pre-order via Amazon here (and help support this site in the process).

I have every intention of acknowledging the Bond half centennial with more features here throughout the year, but in the meantime, check out the trailer for the big box after the jump and feel your pulse start to quicken.

2 comments:

Steve Walker said...

I've been a Bond fan since I saw Goldfinger and went back to catch the others as soon as I could. I was NOT a fan of the Roger Moore part of the series, but it is what it is, I guess. Either way, I'll admit I got chills watching the stupid trailer (FOR A BOXED SET OF MOVIES!!!)

Zaki said...

Can't say I'm as a big a fan of the Moore era as I am of the others, but he's nonetheless an important part of the series' cultural resiliency, which makes his movies worth a look -- even if only in a clinical sense.